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DO I need an amplifier for MOCA?

Discussion in 'MoCA, HomePlug, HPNA' started by pcumming, Jul 11, 2019 at 11:07 AM.

  1. pcumming

    pcumming New Around Here

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2015
    Messages:
    2
    I have a Time Warner setup with plastic box outside and each run to the rooms starts at the box outside. Cable is not used for TV anymore since I am running streaming services.

    *I do use their internet though through TimeWarner spectrum (and Coax).

    When I did use TW/Spectrum they put an amplifier in my living room which plugged into an AC outlet and all that came out of it was a Coax cable. There was no input/output, just output coax. That went to a splitter.

    Would I still need that amp or an approved amplifier for MOCA (since I am not using TimeWarner TV services but using internet) or is it something I would have to try with and without?

    I also assume I would need to upgrade any splitter in their box outside assuming there is one.

    I did determine I have RG6 cable in house that was built in 2001.

    Thank you very much in advance.
    Have a good day
    Sincerely
    Peter
     
  2. krkaufman

    krkaufman Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2018
    Messages:
    227
    It’s very likely that you wouldn’t need any amplification of your cable signal, now that you just need the signal at the one outlet with your modem/gateway; however, you’d want to make sure to minimize losses to this outlet. You’ll also need to ensure that a “PoE” MoCA filter is in place at the cable point-of-entry, optimally installed on the input of the first splitter encountered by the incoming signal.

    If/when replacing splitters, the Holland GHS-PRO-M series are recommended for OTA/cable MoCA (i.e. MoCA Extended Band D) use. You might also want to consider the Amphenol hybrid splitter (see here) as your top-level, initial splitter, if only for compactness, depending on the number of coax runs you need to service from your cable junction box.

    As always, cap any unused ports with a 75-ohm terminator.
     
  3. krkaufman

    krkaufman Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2018
    Messages:
    227
    This makes me wonder if the component in the Living Room was just the power adapter for an amplifier installed in your outside junction box, and that “splitter” was actually a power inserter, used to deliver the DC power up to the amplifier. If so, the power adapter and its power inserter would be removed in conjunction with the amplifier.
     
  4. krkaufman

    krkaufman Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2018
    Messages:
    227
    p.s. Re: your question in the thread subject: “DO I need an amplifier for MOCA?”

    No cable/OTA amplifier amplifies the signals at MoCA frequencies; at best, an amplifier can be designed for MoCA to minimize losses between output ports, and with a built-in “PoE” MoCA filter to further reduce losses between outputs. If an amp is required for boosting cable or OTA signals, care should be taken to use a MoCA-compatible amp, if not one “designed for MoCA”; if amplification isn’t required, it’s best to get known-good MoCA-compatible splitters in place.

    Also, MoCA is designed with its own power adjustment capability to overcome losses ... up to a point. Max loss between MoCA nodes is 53 dB; more loss than that and MoCA’s built-in amplification won’t be of much help.